3 Steps to Better Video

Planning your video before you pull out the gear helps produce the best video possible. This is true whether it is your first video or you consider yourself an expert. It’s important to put the information you gather on paper, because this makes the actual shooting go more smoothly and quickly. Here are three steps to planning your video to help make a better video

Focus On Your Audience

First thing to do when planning the content of your shoot is to consider the audience you are addressing. When doing this, you will find a script is the most important part of the video. No matter what type of video you are planning, you must have a script. In some cases, an outline may be sufficient. In others, you will want to write out pen and paper form clipart modevery word. The script is your guide during the shoot. Stick to it.

A script helps focus on your audience. In most cases, your audience will be your existing customer-base.   However, if you are reaching out to new customers, don’t assume they understand your terminology. Make sure your script explains anything someone not familiar with your business might not know about your business.

Read over your script several times. Then have someone else read it. If you are shooting a ‘how to’ video, double check your script to make sure you haven’t skipped a step that may seem obvious to you, but may not be as obvious to someone only casually acquainted with your business.

If you plan to use an on-camera talent, make sure your spokesperson is comfortable when reading the script aloud before you set up the camera. It is important they speak the script aloud before you are ready to shoot. This way, your talent is completely familiar with the script and it helps find areas in the script with wording that may be awkward to say aloud.

It may not be necessary for your spokesperson to memorize the entire script. Since you will most likely edit the final video, your talent will probably only need to have small sections of the script committed to memory during the shoot.

Show Your Stuff

cooking-dslr-shoot-41The second step is to consider what you need to show your audience. A person speaking on camera for 3-minutes can be an incredibly long time if the speaker is the only thing shown in the video. If your video is about a specific product or service, you will want to make sure to display prominently the product or service.

After recording the person speaking on camera, record scenes of the product or service close up.   If, for example, your video is about a special technique you use to repair a bumper, be sure to show a technician using that technique. A close up of hands doing the process is always good to show while the talent talks about the process or product. Use this video to illustrate what your spokesperson is describing.

We call these “B-roll” shots. You will find it greatly enhances a video to show a close up of the product or the service that is the subject of the video. As you write your script, consider what b-roll shots you might need. Write them down in a shot list that you can refer to when you shoot. This way you do not forget to record the scenes during production.

Time and Place

The third step is to consider when and where you will shoot the video. Planning these basic logistics helps not only with the efficiency of your production, but they also affect the overall look of the final DSC_0661-2video.

Wherever you decide to shoot, keep in mind what you want to have as the focus, or main object of each shot. Be aware of everything else around the main object. In addition, is there something in the background that might distract from what you want the viewer to see? Always look carefully at the scene through the camera to see if anything distracts from the primary focus of the shot.

There may be times you want something extra in the shot, like a logo or something you specifically talk about in the video. You can make room for it in the shot or have it in the background.

When you are recording audio with your video, listen carefully for any background noise that might interfere with your main audio source. Is your scene in an area where people are working? If so, you might plan your shoot for a time when they are not working – like during a lunch break – or ask if they can take a break while you shoot. If nothing else, request they keep noise to a minimum.

If you take a systematic approach to planning your video, you will find the video shoot goes much smoother and editing will be much easier as a result.

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